Magnesium, are you getting enough?

This article on the importance of magnesium is written by Marta Anhelush of Biocare.

If there’s one nutrient we should all consider supplementing, it’s magnesium. Magnesium is one of the most important elements in our body, being involved in over 300 enzymatic reactions.[i] Up to 60% of it is stored in our skeleton. Therefore, just like calcium, it is important for healthy bones and prevention of conditions such as osteoporosis. Its functions stretch far beyond musculoskeletal health, though, and include:

  • Protein synthesis
  • Muscle and nerve function
  • Blood glucose management
  • Heart function and blood pressure regulation
  • Energy production.[ii]

In fact, magnesium is so essential to so many biological functions, that getting extra through diet or supplementation would be beneficial to everyone.

Unfortunately, many of us don’t consume enough magnesium-rich foods. In addition, modern lifestyle can create a big drain on our magnesium reserves. Because magnesium is used for so many processes, it can get easily depleted, especially by stress, erratic eating patterns, high sugar diets, or overtraining. Some common medications, such as acid blockers used for reflux, can also reduce absorption of magnesium.

HOW WOULD YOU KNOW IF YOU NEED MORE MAGNESIUM?

If you suffer from headaches, PMS, muscle cramps, high blood pressure, anxiety, constipation, fatigue, memory problems, hyperactivity, you could be deficient. In fact, a study done in America showed that 48% of the population had inadequate intake of this vital mineral.[iii]

You can naturally increase your magnesium levels by adding more magnesium-rich foods to your diet:

  • Vegetables: leafy greens (spinach, kale, chard, broccoli), and squash
  • Nuts and seeds like pumpkin, sunflower and sesame seeds, almonds and cashews
  • Healthy grains and beans such as quinoa and black beans
  • Also try magnesium baths, using Epsom salts or magnesium flakes. They can be great to relieve muscle pain or help you to relax in the evening.

Make sure you integrate lifestyle strategies to reduce magnesium depletion; eat nutritious foods at regular times, avoid processed foods and refined carbohydrates, reduce stress and allow time for your body to recover from exertion. Ensure your digestion is working optimally to enhance magnesium absorption. If you suffer with any digestive complaints, consider using probiotics or digestive enzymes to help.

SUPPLEMENTATION – WHAT’S THE RIGHT TYPE OF MAGNESIUM FOR YOU?

Increasing food sources of magnesium should be a priority but, if your requirements are high, or if you already have symptoms of deficiency, food alone may not be enough. There’s growing evidence that supplementing magnesium, especially specific types, can help with supporting certain aspects of health. You see, not all magnesium is equal. Choosing the right type is critical to successful nutritional support.

Just as with any other mineral, magnesium has to be bound to a ‘carrier’ molecule when it is consumed in a supplement form. The type of this carrier will determine its use and absorption rate, so it is important to choose the one that suits you best. For example, magnesium citrate was shown to be much more bioavailable (better absorbed and used by the body)than magnesium oxide.[iv] You can also benefit from the other molecule that the magnesium is bound to, as they all have their own unique functions in the body. Some of the most commonly used ones include:

  • Magnesium Citrate – a well absorbed, gentle form that delivers a good amount of magnesium per capsule. So it’s a great choice for general magnesium supplementation when you want a higher dose. One particular study successfully used 600mg of magnesium citrate in the prophylaxis of migraines.[v] It also acts as a gentle laxative so may be helpful to relieve constipation.[vi] In addition, long-term supplementation of magnesium citrate alongside potassium reduced the risk of recurrent kidney stones by 85%.[vii]
  • Magnesium Glycinate –glycine is an amino acid used for a number of important proteins in the body, including haemoglobin in red blood cells or creatine in the muscle. It supports the nervous system, reducing stress and promoting sleep, and improving memoryattention and learning.[viii],[ix] Glycine is a pre-cursor to glutathione – our most potent antioxidant and detoxifier,[x],[xi] and one of the largest components of collagen, which is crucial for healthy skin, joints, ligaments, tendons and bones. Insufficient dietary intake of glycine may interfere with collagen production.[xii]
  • Magnesium Malate –malic acid is a natural compound found in many different foods (e.g. apples). In the body, it is important for energy production. It’s been found to reduce tiredness, tenderness, pain and fatigue in fibromyalgia.[xiii],[xiv]So magnesium malate may be a better choice for those people with energy and fatigue issues. It may also be beneficial for muscle pain and cramps. It doesn’t give quite as much magnesium as other forms, but this isn’t an issue as the malate part is just as important in supporting energy.
  • Magnesium Taurate –an amino acid – taurine, is used to create bile which helps with absorption of fats[xv] in the digestive tract and detoxification of toxins. Through its impact on bile production, it aids natural elimination of cholesterol. In studies, it’s been found to lower LDL cholesterol[xvi],[xvii] and triglycerides, while increasing HDL cholesterol.[xviii] It is also used by the heart muscle for contractions, and may improve arterial function, supporting healthy circulation and blood pressure.[xix],[xx] Taurine also supports the nervous system by activating the calming neurotransmitter GABA.[xxi] So to summarise, magnesium with taurine can be particularly helpful for people with liver or heart problemspoor gallbladder function and reduced fat digestion[xxii] or those with high stress levels or insomnia.

Many of us may need additional magnesium support, but it is important to remember that not all magnesium is equal. Choose the best form for your specific needs and if you need any help, you can call our Clinical Nutrition team or see a practitioner for further advice and support.

Sleep and Exam Stress!

Sleep! It’s so important for our health yet so many of us fail to get enough or at least enough quality sleep, which is what matters. Lack of sleep can have a huge impact on many areas of our health, and in particular stress! Talking about stress, this month sees the beginning of the exam period for many students. Feeling nervous before an exam is completely normal but for some it’s a time of severe stress and anxiety. Thankfully there is plenty we can do to support both sleep and stress levels.

Read moreSleep and Exam Stress!

Support your digestion over the festive season!

The festive season brings a wonderful array of food and drink to enjoy but it’s a time of year when it’s easy to overindulge! All the overeating, especially of rich food, and drinking more alcohol puts a strain on the digestive system and people commonly suffer heartburn, indigestion (including bloating, gas or nausea), constipation or diarrhoea, as a result.

This year be prepared and find out how to support your digestion, so you can enjoy the season’s fayre in a little more comfort!

Read moreSupport your digestion over the festive season!

Natural Support for Joint Health

Picture of runner's legs with sore knee joint, inflamed with red and orange and another picture of a knee joint with red inflammation around the bone

Looking after our joints is not just something for the elderly. Those who do a lot of sport may find their joints hurt with intense or repetitive exercise. For some people it’s the repetitive work related activities which can cause joint pain. There are also specific joint conditions that people suffer with, of which Osteoarthritis is the most common. It is estimated that at least 8 million people in the UK suffer with this form of arthritis, which occurs from wear and tear of the cartilage. The second most common form of arthritis is Rheumatoid Arthritis, which is an autoimmune disease that causes inflammation of the joint. Another common joint condition is Gout, caused by urate crystals in the joints. So what can we do to support our joints?

Read moreNatural Support for Joint Health